Newry.ie

ADVERTISEMENT

 Aonad 11 Unit 11

NOTE: Click the sound file above to hear the Lesson. You can also Click the Green Arrow to Download the file to your Computer 

This unit looks at telling the time. We check the time and talk about times very often each day. It is therefore a practical way to start using your Irish, even when talking to yourself.

We ask the time in Irish by saying:

Cad é an t-am é?

Cad é an t-am é?

We will start with the hours, commencing with one o’clock and finishing at twelve o’clock:

Tá sé a haon a chlog

Tá sé a dó a chlog

Tá sé a trí a chlog

Tá sé a ceathair a chlog

Tá sé a cúig a chlog

Tá sé a sé a chlog

Tá sé a seacht a chlog

Tá sé a hocht a chlog

Tá sé a naoi a chlog

Tá sé a deich a chlog

Tá sé a haon déag a chlog

Tá sé a dó dhéag a chlog.

 

Note the difference between aon déag and dó dhéag

Tá sé a haon déag a chlog

Tá sé a dó dhéag a chlog

 

Agus arís, and again:

 

Tá sé a haon a chlog

Tá sé a dó a chlog

Tá sé a trí a chlog

Tá sé a ceathair a chlog

Tá sé a cúig a chlog

Tá sé a sé a chlog

Tá sé a seacht a chlog

Tá sé a hocht a chlog

Tá sé a naoi a chlog

Tá sé a deich a chlog

Tá sé a haon déag a chlog

Tá sé a dó dhéag a chlog

 

Agus uair amháin eile, and once more:

 

Tá sé a haon a chlog

Tá sé a dó a chlog

Tá sé a trí a chlog

Tá sé a ceathair a chlog

Tá sé a cúig a chlog

Tá sé a sé a chlog

Tá sé a seacht a chlog

Tá sé a hocht a chlog

Tá sé a naoi a chlog

Tá sé a deich a chlog

Tá sé a haon déag a chlog

Tá sé a dó dhéag a chlog

 

We will now work through five minute divisions for times between two o’clock and three o’clock, remembering that in English we say “quarter past” and “half past” etc. These quarter-hour and half-hour markers have their equivalents in Irish. Listen out for them. Listen for ‘ceathrú i ndiaidh’, quarter past, and ‘leath i ndiaidh’, half past.

 

We can say that it is five past two in Irish in two main ways:

Tá sé cúig i ndiaidh a dó 

and

Tá sé cúig tar éis a dó

We will stick with the form “i ndiaidh”. 

 

The principal way of saying in Irish that it is five to three is:

Tá sé cúig go dtí a trí 

Tá sé cúig go dtí a trí 

 

And we will use this “go dtí” form.

 

So let’s rock from two o’clock to three o’clock:

 

Tá sé a dó a chlog

Tá sé cúig i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé deich i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé ceathrú i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé fiche i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé fiche ‘s a cúig i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé leath i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé fiche ‘s a cúig go dtí a trí

Tá sé fiche go dtí a trí

Tá sé ceathrú go dtí a trí

Tá sé deich go dtí a trí

Tá sé cúig go dtí a trí

Tá sé a trí a chlog

Agus arís:

Tá sé a dó a chlog

Tá sé cúig i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé deich i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé ceathrú i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé fiche i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé fiche ‘s a cúig i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé leath i ndiaidh a dó

Tá sé fiche ‘s a cúig go dtí a trí

Tá sé fiche go dtí a trí

Tá sé ceathrú go dtí a trí

Tá sé deich go dtí a trí

Tá sé cúig go dtí a trí

Tá sé a trí a chlog

 

Some speakers insert either of the two words for minute in Irish ie bomaite or nóiméad into their answers but that unnecessarily complicates things at present.

In everyday conversation nevertheless, you might listen for the words 

bomaite

bomaite

nóiméad

nóiméad

 

You will have heard previously

Tá sé ceathrú i ndiaidh a dó

It is quarter past two

Tá sé ceathrú i ndiaidh a dó

 

You will have also heard

Tá sé leath i ndiaidh a dó

It is half past two

Tá sé leath i ndiaidh a dó

 

And you heard too

Tá sé ceathrú go dtí a trí

It is quarter to three

Tá sé ceathrú go dtí a trí

 

Now listen to the following random times, with their quarter hour or half hour markers. They will be spoken at a natural speed.

 

Cad é an t-am é?

Tá sé ceathrú go dtí a deich

 

Cad é an t-am é?

Tá sé leath i ndiaidh a dó dhéag

 

Cad é an t-am é?

Tá sé ceathrú i ndiaidh a trí

 

Uair is the Irish word for hour and it is another word for time. 

 

Go dtí an chéad uair eile, until the next time, go dtí an chéad uair eile, slán go fóíill.

Pin It
Newry.ie require Cookies on some parts of our site to enable full functionality. By using Newry.ie you consent to our use of Cookies. You can use your browser settings to disable cookies on this or any other website.
More information Ok